The School for Good and Evil | Book Review

The first kidnappings happened two hundred years before. Some years it was two boys taken, some years two girls, sometimes one of each. But if at first the choices seemed random, soon the pattern became clear. One was always beautiful and good, the child every parent wanted as their own. The other was homely and odd, an outcast from birth. An opposing pair, plucked from youth and spirited away.

This year, best friends Sophie and Agatha are about to discover where all the lost children go: the fabled School for Good & Evil, where ordinary boys and girls are trained to be fairy tale heroes and villains. As the most beautiful girl in Gavaldon, Sophie has dreamed of being kidnapped into an enchanted world her whole life. With her pink dresses, glass slippers, and devotion to good deeds, she knows she’ll earn top marks at the School for Good and graduate a storybook princess. Meanwhile Agatha, with her shapeless black frocks, wicked pet cat, and dislike of nearly everyone, seems a natural fit for the School for Evil.

Who should read The School for Good and Evil:

  • If you want to read something that doesn’t take itself too seriously.
  • If you enjoy a fairytale retelling
  • If you want to read about some stereotyping breaking girls.

Who shouldn’t read The School for Good and Evil:

  • You want serious literature with well-rounded characters.
  • You don’t like cheese.
  • You want to read something with substance.

These books follow two young girls who are taken from their homes and our thrown into a school where fairytales are very much real.

The first kidnappings happened two hundred years before. Some years it was two boys taken, some years two girls, sometimes one of each. But if at first the choices seemed random, soon the pattern became clear. One was always beautiful and good, the child every parent wanted as their own. The other was homely and odd, an outcast from birth. An opposing pair, plucked from youth and spirited away.

The first thing I should say about these books is that they are no where near being a work of literature, they are childish and the characters aren’t by any way or form as well-formed as some, but this isn’t the point of the books.

There is a fun element to The School for Good and Evil that make the lack of literary talent worth it. The characters, especially Sophie makes you want to pull your hair out and Agatha makes you want to slap her across her face. But the journey they go on through the books make you understand their flaws and it becomes something you begin to love.

If you want something that is completely ‘girl power’ seriously stop reading this book now. The majority of the story centres around a boy and how they can create a friendship around true love. It becomes apparent that a girl’s life has to include a boy (for the majority). The message at the end makes the whole trilogy worth it.

I’m not really selling this book, but that’s purely because I genuinely don’t know why I love this series so much. Let’s face it, it has all the things that I usually hate about books in but it pulls it off, like totally pulls it off.

The sarcasm and the snarky remarks in these books are hilarious and genuinely had me laughing out loud like an idiot. So maybe that’s it, maybe I’m drawn to sarcasm and innuendos. I’m a bad person I guess. Sometimes the characters are what makes the book good, and that’s okay.

I have to say the way that fairytales are integrated into the storyline of these books is fantastic, it’s subtle but also in your face. It never overtakes the main characters story but runs wonderfully beside it. I love this. It’s one of my favourite things about this series.

I really recommend this series, if you’re looking for something light and fluffy to read this is the book series for you. Don’t expect too much and you’ll be grand. I promise.

Have you ever found such deep joy within a series of books like I did in The School for Good and Evil? Let me know, I want to read more happy books.

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